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44 Times More Than a Renter

by The Mike Parker Team

 

The Federal Reserve Board's Triennial Survey of Consumer Finances recently revealed the net worth of a homeowner was $231,400 compared to $5,200 for a renter.  The net worth of homeowners increased 15% from 2013 to 2016 while renters' decreased by 5%.

Appreciation and principal reduction are the two dynamics that affect a homeowner's equity.  Each payment is applied to the interest for the previous month and the principal reduction to retire the mortgage.

A $300,000 home purchased with a $294,566 FHA mortgage at 5% for 30 years has an average monthly principal reduction $362 in the first year. Two percent appreciation would benefit the buyer by $500 a month.  In this example, the equity grows by $860 a month for the homeowner.  A tenant would have to invest $660 a month over and above the rent they're paying.

Based on the assumptions listed above, the $10,500 down payment would become approximately $85,000 of equity in seven years.Leverage and forced savings contribute to the difference in addition to the appreciation and principal reduction.

The rent paid by tenants help the landlord recoup their investment in the home and a return on their investment.  Some people say, regardless if a person rents or buys, they pay for the house they occupy.  The choice is whether to buy it for themselves or their landlord.

Check out some of the benefits using your own numbers with this fill-in-the blank Rent vs. Own.

Rent or Buy - the cost is going up

by The Mike Parker Team

Whether you continue to rent or decide to buy a home, according to recent Zillow 2014 housing projections, the cost is going up.  Zillow projects home prices to increase nationally by 3%, mortgages to rise to %5 interest rate by the end of the year and rents to go up by 2.5% on average.

If it will cost a person more whether they rent or buy, the conclusion can be made that one way or the other, they will pay for the house they occupy.  The question will be whether they buy it for themselves or their landlord? Will they benefit from the equity build-up and the appreciation?

The following analysis looks at a $200,000 home that can be purchased with a 30 year FHA mortgage at 4.3%.  The assumption uses 3% appreciation and tenant currently paying $1,750 a month in rent.

The house payment, principal, interest, taxes and insurance would be about $1,609 a month.  However, once you consider the benefits of the principal reduction each month, the appreciation and the tax savings and the increased cost of maintenance, the net cost of housing is closer to $630 per month.

Even if you ignored the tax savings, the net cost of housing would only be $919.06 per month.  The tenant would pay considerably more to rent than to own the home.  Over time, the decision to buy a home could result in a considerable financial asset that the tenant will not benefit from.

To estimate your cost of housing, use the Rent vs. Own

Rent Or Buy......

by The Mike Parker Team

 

Rent or Buy?

The question plaguing every tenant who wants a home of their own is whether they should continue to rent or is it the right time to buy?

 

The combination of good prices and low mortgage rates make it considerably cheaper to own than rent in most markets. Assuming a person is qualified with a down payment and won't be moving for several years, there may not be a better time to buy a home.

In the example below, the total house payment is $1,281.01 compared to $1,500 to rent the same home. Before you consider any of the financial benefits attached to home ownership, it's cheaper to own than to rent.

The net cost of housing falls to $764 or just more than half the house payment when you consider the principal reduction due to normal amortization, a modest appreciation and the tax savings along with a reasonable maintenance expense that a tenant would not have to pay.

One of the biggest benefits is the growing equity. As the value goes up, the unpaid balance goes down. A favorable leverage causes their low down payment to grow to $40,609 in a short seven years based on a modest 1% appreciation.

 

There's an expression often heard in real estate circles: "Whether you rent or buy, you pay for the house you occupy." You're either buying it for yourself or you're helping the landlord buy it.

Check out a Rent vs. Own to see how your numbers will compare to this example or call me to do it for you.

How to Rent Your Vacation Property ... Fast

by The Mike Parker Team

If you have a second home or vacation property you're looking to sell, this market may prove to be exceptionally tough. That's why leasing your property, at least for now, is something you should seriously consider. With the winter months upon us, now is the perfect time to start marketing your property for the summer season.

As a member of the Top 5 in Real Estate Network®, I have access to a plethora of information related to this subject, so I am well-versed on how to help facilitate the rental of your vacation property.

These five tips, for example, are from vacation property experts HomeAway.com:

  • Study the competition. Look at listings for vacation rentals in your area to get an idea of what they offer and how much they charge.
  • Take lots of great photos of your property. Note: No people in the photos, please! Make it easy for your prospective renters to visualize themselves in the scene. And be sure to "dress the set" the way professional photographers do, with an arrangement of colorful flowers on the coffee table, or a dining table set up for a family dinner.
  • Talk to your real estate professional about listing your property on vacation rental/second home sites, and other marketing strategies that will garner the most exposure for your property.
  • Run your vacation rental like a business. Build a team of reliable cleaning and service people, collect and pay local and state sales tax, get set up to accept credit cards, maintain an online availability calendar, and always respond quickly to inquiries from prospective renters.
  • Remember: You're in the hospitality business. Think of yourself as a host and your prospective renters as guests. With this mindset, you're sure to be successful as a vacation-rental owner.

The above suggestions can help you get the jump-start you need to lease out your vacation rental and help start bringing in some additional revenue. Be sure to speak with a professional real estate agent where your vacation home is located for specific tips related to that area.

For more tips like this, please e-mail me and please feel free to forward this information to anyone you think might benefit from it.

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Photo of Mike Parker - CRS Real Estate
Mike Parker - CRS
HUFF Realty
60 Cavalier Blvd.
Florence KY 41042
859-647-0700